Wire Cut Machine Manufacturer

EXCETEK’s wire cut EDM is one of the most popular EDM machines ever produced in Taiwan due to their competitive features. EXCETEK insists in the quality policy that offers only the best Wire Cut machines as well as related accessories. There are major four series that can meet most of the EDM processing demands. Wire Cut NP Series Comply with TUV CE comformity, both safety and desired design with easy operation. Power slider door design to save installation space and light operation. This Wire Cut machine also take advantages of the technology:

1. High Precision: Smart Conrner Control、Stable Discharge Module、SFC Super Finish Circuit.

2. Efficiency: DPM module、Entrance mark control、EF Electrolysis Free generator system

3. Cost Saving: Intellignet Power Management、Save Wire Consumption、Low running cost.

4. Intelligent Networking: Remote monitor and management、Connect all Controller、Portable device monitor.

5. Automation: High speed Auto Wire Threading、Workpiece Transfer Robot、Auto Measurement and Correction.

YC Inox Stainless Steel Pipe

Stainless Steel Pipe

YC Inox acquires ISO 9001, ISO 17025 lab 14001, OHSAS 18001 occupation safety & hygiene, and TOSHMS certificate. Moreover, our Stainless Steel Pipe are approved by CNS Mark, JIS Mark, CE Mark, and many ship building associations such as DNV (Norway), RINA (Italy), BV (France), GL (Germany), and LR (UK), and as well as the EU pressure container PED/AD2000 certificate and NSF/ANSI 61 drinking water certificate.

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When wondering about widgets, one would be wise to weigh which widget is a widget worth welcoming.

Apologies for my atrociously annoying alliteration. (Ah, blast. There I go again.) The thing about a widget, though, is — well, it sounds silly. And it’s easy to write off as being irrelevant to your life as an Extremely Serious Smartphone User.

But playful as they may seem — and frivolous as they often appear — Android widgets can actually be a real asset when it comes to mobile productivity. In fact, once you wade through the Play Store’s endless-seeming array of weather widgets, clock widgets, and, uh, more weather widgets, a sea of genuinely useful options awaits.

To read this article in full, please click here

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When wondering about widgets, one would be wise to weigh which widget is a widget worth welcoming.

Apologies for my atrociously annoying alliteration. (Ah, blast. There I go again.) The thing about a widget, though, is — well, it sounds silly. And it’s easy to write off as being irrelevant to your life as an Extremely Serious Smartphone User.

But playful as they may seem — and frivolous as they often appear — Android widgets can actually be a real asset when it comes to mobile productivity. In fact, once you wade through the Play Store’s endless-seeming array of weather widgets, clock widgets, and, uh, more weather widgets, a sea of genuinely useful options awaits.

To read this article in full, please click here

via Computerworld Operating Systems https://ift.tt/2PQ0mIM

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In the world of technology, some changes seem to happen with the snap of a finger. A new operating system update hits your phone, and bam! You’ve got a next-gen gesture navigation system and all sorts of other interface changes. The cause and effect are both immediate and obvious.

Other times, change can happen in a much more subdued and piecemeal manner — an evolution-like progression, with subtle and often insignificant-seeming shifts showing up bit by bit over time. In and of themselves, each shift may not look like much. But add them all together, and you realize a massive transformation has been building up in front of your eyes (you know, the whole “seeing the forest for the trees” thing).

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Apple is about to backload 2018, introducing a host of new products including its new iPad Pro range, and while most attention is directed at next-gen iPhones, there’s lots of reasons to think about Apple’s pro tablets.

Bringing iPhones and iPads closer

At time of writing it seems likely the new iPad Pros will offer Face ID and lack a Home button. iOS 12 suggests this because the iPad’s user interface is so similar to that of the iPhone X: you invoke Control Center, access App switcher and jump between apps using the same gestures.

To read this article in full, please click here

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Smaller monthly updates for Windows 10 may help push the operating system onto more machines as its predecessor faces retirement, a patch expert said.

“Lots of companies are feeling the pain [of large updates] and deferring or delaying migration to Windows 10 because of that,” said Chris Goettl, product manager with client security and management vendor Ivanti, in an interview last week. “We should see Windows 10 adoption move forward again because [customers] can overcome the size problem.”

[ Related: Windows 7 to Windows 10 migration guide ]

Currently, Microsoft delivers three different sizes of quality updates — security patches and non-security bug fixes that are issued several times monthly — full, express and a third, dubbed delta. However, beginning with Windows 10 1809, the feature upgrade set to ship next month or in October, Microsoft will offer only one size; that update will be considerably smaller than what Microsoft now calls the full update and only slightly larger than express on individual PCs.

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Apple’s official letter of response to the chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce this month was designed to alleviate congressional fears about the company invading its customers’ privacy. But a close reading of the letter does the opposite, pointing out the many ways sensitive data is retained even when the consumer says no. And that retained data is only one crafty cyberthief away from getting out.

The problem with the letter is that it assumes that technology always works perfectly and that security safeguards are never overcome by attackers — or even nosey, technically astute romantic partners. Such thinking, that we live in a state of nirvana, is the one of the biggest privacy and security problems today, with vendors routinely — and unrealistically and arrogantly — assuming that they have anticipated and negated all security holes.

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The upcoming version of Windows 10, which industry watchers expect will arrive in September, has many monikers. Its version number is 1809, and its code name is Redstone 5. Microsoft has not yet announced its official post-launch name, but if it follows the convention set by the previous release, called the April 2018 Update, it will be called the Windows 10 September 2018 Update.

Windows 10 April 2018 UpdateWindows 10 Fall Creators Update (October 2018)

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(Insider Story)

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People all over the country, and in fact all over the entire world, have become addicted to their wireless smartphone, apps and services. And it’s only getting worse with every year that passes. New apps that help us manage, monitor, use and do everything in our lives are popping up every day. We love what this technology can do for us. We write about it and talk about it, but we don’t discuss how addictive these are to us.

We’ve all watched in amazement as the wireless industry has grown and changed, time and time again over the last several decades. During the last decade the industry has become a very different place. Growth has exploded with the Apple iPhone, Google Android and Samsung Galaxy smartphones. Apps have exploded from a few hundred a decade ago, to more than two million today.

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Windows 10 on Chromebooks? At first, it sounds downright stupid. You can already do just about everything on a Chromebook with Chrome OS, including running a ton of Windows apps. Why bother? I have some ideas, but first, the background.

The eagle-eyed developers at XDA Developers have spotted a new Google Pixelbook firmware branch. This new code, “eve-campfire,” includes a new “Alt OS mode.” That “Alt OS”? WIndows 10.

To read this article in full, please click here

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Microsoft will apply an unusual patching process to reduce the size of its monthly Windows 10 updates, a company manager said this week.

“If your device were on the September LCU (latest cumulative update) and then you installed October, your machine would apply the September reverse delta to go back to RTM and then the October forward delta to go to October [emphases added],” wrote Mike Benson, a principal program manager in the Windows division, in a comment appended to a previous post about update changes.

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